Resilience measure: Artificial sand dunes and dune rehabilitation

definition

Naturally occurring sand dunes are wind-formed sand deposits representing a store of sediment in the zone just landward of normal high tides. Artificial dunes are engineered structures created to mimic the functioning of natural dunes. Dune rehabilitation refers to the restoration of natural or artificial dunes from a more impaired, to a less impaired or unimpaired state of overall function, in order to gain the greatest coastal protection benefits. (Climate Technology Centre & Network, Information related to Dune construction and stabilisation, accessed on Sept. 2016)

Co-benefits and impacts

Artificial dune construction and dune rehabilitation are technologies aimed at reducing both coastal erosion and flooding in adjacent coastal lowlands. As dunes provide both physical and tangible defence, they may even serve to encourage sustainable development within the coastal zone. Dunes are naturally occurring features, and provided the construction/initiation of artificial dunes is completed in a sympathetic manner, they do not necessarily spoil the local landscape. Many sandy beaches would have had naturally occurring sand dune complexes prior to coastline development; as such, the initiation of artificial dunes may even restore a degree of natural character to the site. Sand dunes also provide a valuable coastal habitat for many highly specialised plants and animals. Therefore, sand dunes may be considered important both ecologically and recreationally. (Climate Technology Centre & Network, Information related to Dune construction and stabilisation, accessed on Sept. 2016)

Related Links



Scales (Show all)

City

Land uses (Show all)

Coastal


Time scales (Show all)

Medium term


Problem types (Show all)

Coastal
Fluvial

Resilience measures (Show all)

Managed realignment



Last modified: Sept. 21, 2016, 7:53 a.m.