Resilience measures

Name Definition
Urban forest and park An urban forest is a forest or a collection of trees that grow within a city, town or a suburb. In a wider sense it may include any kind of woody plant vegetation growing in and around human settlements. Cities can use parks to reduce public costs for stormwater management, ...
Aquifer recharge Aquifer recharge is achieved by adding surface water in basins, furrows, ditches, wells or other facilities where it infiltrates into the soil and recharges the aquifers. Aquifer recharge allows water retention underground. During flood events, water can be redirected to aquifer's area. (Bouwer H., 2001)
Amphibious building Amphibious buildings lie on the ground out of flood periods and are likely to float when the water level rises during flood. They do not therefore float permanently unlike the floating buildings which can be found in many countries in urban areas along lakes or slow-flowing rivers. The principle is ...
Afforestation Land use conversion is a general term for large scale geographic change. Afforestation is one such land conversion in which trees are planted on previously non forested areas. Depending on the tree species planted and the intensity of forest management, afforestation may have more or less environmental benefits. The greatest ...
Floating agricultural system Floating agriculture is a way of utilising areas which are waterlogged for long periods of time in the production of food. The technology is mainly aimed at adapting to more regular or prolonged flooding. The approach employs beds of rotting vegetation, which act as compost for crop growth. These beds ...
Floating building The basic characteristic of floating buildings is that they are not supported by a firm foundation, but float on water. Traditional foundations are therefore not required. The position of a floating building is permanently fixed in a horizontal direction, while it can flexibly follow vertical variations in water level. The ...
Land use plan / spatial planning Spatial planning systems are the methods used by the public sector to influence the distribution of people and activities in spaces of various scales, whereas land use plans govern/regulate the possibilities of construction on the territory of the municipality through definition of building codes and zoning ordinances (Nilsson K. and ...
Wetland and wetland restoration A wetland (Natural or Constructed/Artificial) is a land area that is saturated with water, either permanently or seasonally, such that it takes on the characteristics of a distinct ecosystem. Primarily, the factor that distinguishes wetlands from other land forms or water bodies is the characteristic vegetation of aquatic plants, adapted ...
Beach nourishment Beach nourishment is an adaptation technology primarily used in response to shoreline erosion, although flood reduction benefits may also occur. It is the process by which sediment (usually sand) lost through longshore drift or erosion. Beach nourishment is typically part of a larger coastal defense scheme. It is a soft ...
Artificial sand dunes and dune rehabilitation Naturally occurring sand dunes are wind-formed sand deposits representing a store of sediment in the zone just landward of normal high tides. Artificial dunes are engineered structures created to mimic the functioning of natural dunes. Dune rehabilitation refers to the restoration of natural or artificial dunes from a more impaired, ...
Rain garden A rain garden is a planted depression or a hole that allows rainwater runoff from impervious urban areas, like roofs, driveways, walkways, parking lots, and compacted lawn areas, the opportunity to be absorbed. This reduces rain runoff by allowing stormwater to soak into the ground (as opposed to flowing into ...