Resilience measures

Name Definition
Floodwall A floodwall is a primarily vertical artificial barrier designed to temporarily contain the water of a river or other waterway which may rise to unusual levels during seasonal or extreme weather events. They can be realised as mobile flood protection walls, which are build up before a storm event occurs ...
Dry-floodproofing technology Dry floodproofing is a method of flood preparation that involves building designs and material choices that do not allow for the entry of floodwaters into the structure. This resilience measure should be designed to account for the height of building flood elevations, buoyancy and hydrostatic pressures of flood waters, and ...
Filled container These are cellular barriers filled with aggregates or water to form a barrier against floodwater. Containers can be divided into two categories, permeable and impermeable. In both cases, they serve as gravity dams, using the weight of the aggregate or water for stability. These containers are another example of temporary ...
Amphibious building Amphibious buildings lie on the ground out of flood periods and are likely to float when the water level rises during flood. They do not therefore float permanently unlike the floating buildings which can be found in many countries in urban areas along lakes or slow-flowing rivers. The principle is ...
Coastal setback Coastal setbacks are a prescribed distance to a coastal feature such as the line of permanent vegetation, within which all or certain types of development are prohibited. A setback may dictate a minimum distance from the shoreline for new buildings or infrastructure facilities, or may state a minimum elevation above ...
Floating agricultural system Floating agriculture is a way of utilising areas which are waterlogged for long periods of time in the production of food. The technology is mainly aimed at adapting to more regular or prolonged flooding. The approach employs beds of rotting vegetation, which act as compost for crop growth. These beds ...
Floating building The basic characteristic of floating buildings is that they are not supported by a firm foundation, but float on water. Traditional foundations are therefore not required. The position of a floating building is permanently fixed in a horizontal direction, while it can flexibly follow vertical variations in water level. The ...
Beach nourishment Beach nourishment is an adaptation technology primarily used in response to shoreline erosion, although flood reduction benefits may also occur. It is the process by which sediment (usually sand) lost through longshore drift or erosion. Beach nourishment is typically part of a larger coastal defense scheme. It is a soft ...
Artificial sand dunes and dune rehabilitation Naturally occurring sand dunes are wind-formed sand deposits representing a store of sediment in the zone just landward of normal high tides. Artificial dunes are engineered structures created to mimic the functioning of natural dunes. Dune rehabilitation refers to the restoration of natural or artificial dunes from a more impaired, ...
Vulnerability assessment Vulnerability assessment is important in to consider in risk management and flood damage assessment. Researches with vulnerability subject involves diverse descriptions for vulnerability; in United Nations’ description vulnerability is a degree of damage to a certain objects at flood risk with specified amount and present in a scale from 0 ...